British Marques Know How to Draw a Crowd

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By EVAN MCMULLEN
SPECIAL TO THE POST-INTELLIGENCER

Scores of historic British cars filled the grounds of Bellevue Community College July 22-24 for the 17th annual All British Field Meet.

Organized by the Pacific Northwest British Automotive Society and largely executed by Bellevue’s Arnold and Sue Taub, this year’s event showcased Aston Martin and was co-sponsored by Aston Martin of Tacoma and Park Place Ltd. of Bellevue. Well-known marques such as Jaguar, Triumph, MG, Rolls-Royce, Bentley and Land Rover were proudly displayed by their owners or representatives. Lesser-known marques such as Austin, Jensen, Humber, Morgan, A.C. and even Ginetta were also on display.

One of the most fascinating and probably the most valuable car at the event was the 1957 Aston Martin DBR2 belonging to Greg Whitten. This famous car equaled the sports-car lap record at Silverstone in England. The 3.7-liter, six-cylinder DBR2 sported a revised chassis from its predecessor and was later fitted with a 3.9 and finally a 4.2. The twin-cam rival to the Jaguar D-Type was named “Best of Show.” Other award recipients included 63 individual class winners as well as awards for Best Preserved Car (a 1954 MGTF belonging to Bill Olson), the Car Driven the Furthest to the Event Award (a 1968 Triumph TR 250 driven from Wyoming by David Gustafson) and the Young Restorers Award (by Aaron Skirvan in his 1974 MG BGT). Skirvan, a 16-year-old, actually bought the car the year before in the “for sale” area of the event. Needing a total restoration, the car reappeared this year completely refurbished. The Directors Award was awarded to Bill Hart for his 1968 Triumph TR 250K Prototype Race Car.

Next year’s event is scheduled for July 22, again at Bellevue Community College. For information: www.abfm.com or 425-644-7874.

A Stampede of Italian Horsepower

For the sixth year in a row, Ferraris littered the streets of Capitol Hill recently as 150 Ferraris flooded 12th Avenue in an opulent display of craftsmanship, style and performance. The darling of Ferrari-Maserati of Seattle, the event involves a display next to the Seattle Police Department’s East Precinct and later a massive exodus to Marymoor Park for lunch, hosted by Ferrari of Seattle. Entrants are requested to donate to Children’s Hospital and Regional Medical Center. This year, about $7,500 was raised.

Older ’60s cars such as a 330 GTC, 275 GTB/4, 250SWB and a 275 GTS mingled with 550 Maranellos, 360 Modenas, 355 Spyders, 456 GTs, F40s and an Enzo. Roberto Pasquale of Ferrari-Maserati of Seattle led the pack in the first of the newest of the Ferrari models, the 430. The event grows each year and is open to the public. For information: 206-329-7070.

Real Romeos in Bellevue

Alfa Romeo is one of the most celebrated automotive marques in the world. The Milan, Italy-based company held an unrivaled early racing history. From Alfa’s triumphs in the 1920s and ’30s was born the world-renowned Scuderia Ferrari. The legendary Enzo Ferrari led Alfa to world records in his youth and later created his own company, Ferrari, perhaps the greatest sports car of all time.

American Alfa enthusiasm endures today, even though the marque has been absent from North America for more 15 years. This year, the national Alfa Romeo Owners Club meeting was Sunday at Bellevue Community College. Alfisti (as the Alfa enthusiasts are affectionately called) convened from all over the world. The event is sponsored by the enthusiastic Northwest Alfa Romeo Owners Club, which has been in existence for 40 years. Among the hundreds of Alfas was a formidable early race car, a 1932 P-3 Monoposto. The car is worth several million dollars and is one of the most coveted automobiles in the world.

For information about future Alfa events: Northwest AROC, 312 211th Place S.E., Sammamish, WA, 98074; Fred Wright, 425-369-0699; or www.nwalfaclub.com.

Evan McMullen is proprietor of Cosmopolitan Motors in Seattle.